Tifton Actress Names A Top 5 Child Star TV Character

A television entertainment news web site, TVOvermind, has named Tifton native Caitlin Carmichael as one of “The Five Top Child Star Characters on Television Right Now.” Carmichael, 12, was recognized for her acting work as the voice of Alma Dinky Doo on the Disney Junior Channel’s  “Doc McStuffins” animated TV series. “She is known for her recurring role as Alma in the poplar children’s television series ‘Doc McStuffins.’ In addition to her successful career in television movies, she has also appeared other TV series including ‘Z Nation,’ ‘The Loud House,’ ‘Agent Carter,’ ‘The Legend of Korra,’ ‘Suburgatory,’ ‘Chosen,’ ‘Criminal Minds,’ ‘Vegas,’ ‘The Neighbors,’ ‘Retired at 35,’ ‘Daybreak,’ ‘Badgirls’ and several other television series. Caitlin is a child star who has already risen to the status of veteran actor,” the web site wrote earlier this week. Dottie “Doc” McStuffins is a six-year-old girl who communicates secretly to toys and heals plush animals in her backyard clinic. The show is aimed at teaching children how to take care of themselves and others, along with living healthy lifestyles. Carmichael’s recurring character Alma is the younger sister of Doc’s best friend Emma.
Source: Tifton Grapevine

Easterseals Honors Tift Board Members

Easterseals Southern Georgia this week presented Distinguished Service Awards to outgoing officers on its Tift County Board. President James L. Montgomery, Vice President David Hetzel and Secretary Veronica Graydon, who was absent, were honored for 11 years of service. “Their leadership built our board to 20 members, developed a great local fundraiser that provides the funds needed for our local day program participants to enjoy field trips and outings, Wild Adventures and so much more,” says Executive Director Beth English. “Our entire board understands the importance of advocacy and supports disability issues at the Capitol.”

Source: Tifton Grapevine

Tift Basketball Coach Praises Program

Chris Wade, Tift County High School’s new head basketball coach, told the Tifton Rotary Club on Wednesday that there is a decades-long tradition of a first-class basketball program at TCHS, and he will work to continue that tradition. Wade said Tift’s state-championship team will be in a rebuilding phase next season, and there is some up-and-coming talent. The former assistant coach was named head coach when Coach Eric Holland resigned recently to accept the position of principal at Rome High School. In the photo above, Coach Wade, at right, stands with Tifton Rotary Club President Jeremy Campbell.

Source: Tifton Grapevine

Watermelon Season Begins

Watermelon season is starting in South Georgia. Not only are they tasty but watermelons are big business in Georgia with a $124.5 million farm gate value in 2015, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. But along with ripening watermelons, fusarium wilt is also rising in Georgia watermelon fields. UGA scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation. Fumigation is a method of pest control that involves using volatile compounds in a restricted area to kill pests and pathogens. Research on fumigation with the fungicide Proline is yielding promising results, according to Bhabesh Dutta, UGA Cooperative Extension vegetable pathologist at the UGA Tifton campus. “I am encouraged by the outcomes of the first year of this trial. We conducted this trial in a field with a history of fusarium wilt. To get a reduction in disease incidence down to as little as 4 percent is encouraging,” he said. Dutta is collaborating with UGA Extension vegetable specialist Tim Coolong and UGA Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources agents Will Gay in Turner County and Josh Grant in Crisp County. The research team plans to continue conducting field trials on the interactive effect of using both a fumigant and a fungicide to control fusarium wilt. In the past four to five years, fusarium wilt emerged as the biggest disease that watermelon farmers face.

Source: Tifton Grapevine

Wound Care Awareness TRMC Clinic Receives Recognition

The Wound Care and Hyperbaric Clinic at Tift Regional Medical Center has been helping raise awareness of chronic wounds. The fourth annual Wound Care Awareness Week ends today. It is estimated that chronic wounds affect 6.7 million people in the U.S., and the incidence is rising, fueled by an aging population and increasing rates of diseases and conditions such as diabetes, obesity and the late effects of radiation therapy. If left untreated, chronic wounds can lead to diminished quality of life and possibly amputation of the affected limb. “We see patients living with non-healing wounds for a prolonged amount of time due to the lack of awareness of advanced wound care options,” said Dr. D. Scott Covington, chief medical director for healogics. “We work to educate community physicians about which of their patients can benefit from advanced wound care, and then provide coordinated care to heal that patient’s wounds.” The TRMC Wound Care and Hyperbaric Clinic recently received the Robert A. Warriner III Center of Excellence Award. The clinic achieved outstanding clinical outcomes for 24 consecutive months, including patient satisfaction higher than 92 percent and a minimum healing rate of at least 91 percent within 30 median days to heal. The clinic also was awarded President’s Circle Honors, which places the clinic in the top 15 percent of all healogics network wound-care facilities nationwide.

Source: Tifton Grapevine

SRTC RECOGNIZES TOP STUDENTS

On Tuesday, May 23, Southern Regional Technical College (SRTC) recognized students achieving the honor of being on the President’s List. The college also recognized students with a certificate who earned Dean’s List and Merit List honors. Each semester, SRTC recognizes students who have accomplished high academic achievement through the President’s List. In order to qualify, students must earn a grade of “A” in all coursework attempted and be enrolled in 12 semester credit hours or more at the college. One hundred and fifty-eight made the President’s List for spring semester. Among those receiving the President’s List designation are: Gabrielle Rucker of Tifton, Abigail Boatner of Tifton, Danette Miley of Alapaha, Joseph Fernandez of Norman Park, Michael Kinsey of Norman Park, Jeremy Walker of Tifton, Amber Harper of Ocilla, Carlos Gonzalez of Norman Park, Richard Smith of Norman Park, Jason Anderson of Tifton, Heather Scarbor of Omega, Sheree Hamilton of Norman Park, Brooklin Grimes of Ashburn, Deanna Daniel of Sylvester, Kendall Wilson of Sylvester, Selene Belton-Allen of Tifton, Tynesia Whitehead of Ashburn, Leslie Hancock of Tifton, Edward Farley of Chula, Felix Torres of Tifton, Kaylee Timmons of Ashburn, Charles Thornton of Ocilla, David Owen of Tifton, Dustin Wilson of Tifton, Mathew Robinson of Omega, Alyssa Brown of Sycamore, Ashley Justice of Tifton, Dakyrae Holmes of Ashburn, Hunter Henderson of Tifton, Jarod Henderson of Sycamore, Jaylen Maloy of Tifton, Logan Hill of Tifton, MarQuavius Prater of Ashburn, Marlee Marlowe of Tifton, Quenterion Tennille of  Ashburn, Riley Mims of Fitzgerald,  Deja Chaney of Tifton, David Olguin of Ty Ty, and Jodine Adkins of Sylvester. To qualify for Dean’s List, students must have completed between nine and 11 semester credit hours and have earned an “A” in all coursework attempted. For the spring term 124 students achieved the distinction. Additionally, 611 students were recognized for making the Merit List.
Source: Tifton Grapevine

Tift Canning Plant Opens June 5

The Tift County Canning Plant opens June 5 for residents who wish to preserve their fruits, vegetables, soups, salsas, juices and other foods to enjoy all year long. The Canning Plant will be open Mondays through Thursdays from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. June 5-July 6 (and closed on July 4). It is located in the back of the Agriscience Building behind Tift County High School. Customers are asked to enter the bus entrance off of New River Church Road. The Agriscience Building is the first building on the right. Please load and unload from the back of the building and move vehicles from the loading docks to allow access for other customers. The only cost in canning your produce is the current cost of the metal quart can or 15 cents per glass jar (glass jars are not  provided). Cans are provided for a minimal cost. Customers must provide canning jars, lids, rings and /or freezer bags. Can costs are subject to change because of price fluctuations, and customers are asked to inquire before processing. Services available include canning, blanching, corn creaming, juicing and potato peeling. Blanching for freezing costs $1 per blanching tray. (More than 50 ears of corn or two bushels of peas per tray). Inquire for pricing of other services such as shelling and creaming. The Canning Plant is open to any local resident for processing food for home use only. For information, call 229-387-2475 or 229-387-2400. The Tift County Food Processing Center is an educational public service provided through the cooperative efforts of the Tift County Board of Education, the county Agriculture Education Department and the Georgia State Department of Education. 
Source: Tifton Grapevine