Wash Your Hands… It’s the Right Thing to Do and Keeps You Well Too!

It’s National Hand Washing Week and we want to help keep everyone well. I know we at The Martin News has ran this information several times but if just one new person reads it this week, that may be a few more people that keeps the sicknesses down this winter. Hand washing is easy to do and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness in all settings which includes from your home and workplace to child care facilities and hospitals. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. Many people ask when they should wash their hands. The answer is quiet simple and includes but is not limited to these. Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food, Before and after caring for someone who is sick, Before and after treating a cut or wound, After using the toilet, After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste and After touching garbage. Well as simple as that sounds, many say they do not know the right way to wash their hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tell us to Wet our hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water and last, Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. Often we are out and about and need to wash our hands and may not have soap and clean, running water. Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy. You may ask “how do you use hand sanitizers?” Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount). Rub your hands together. Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. With December being Hand Washing Awareness Week, please take these tips provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and use them all year long!

Say No To Pinkeye

Recently I have had a severe case of pinkeye. I do not ever remember having it like this, if I have ever had this at all. I am still having issues and want to help anyone and everyone to prevent this. Pinkeye is spread through contact with the eye drainage, which contains the virus or bacteria that caused the pinkeye. Touching an infected eye leaves drainage on your hand. If you touch your other eye or an object when you have drainage on your hand, the virus or bacteria can be spread. The following tips help prevent the spread of pinkeye. Wash your hands before and after: Touching the eyes or face and using medicine in the eyes. Do not share eye makeup. Do not use eye makeup until the infection is fully cured, because you could re-infect yourself with the eye makeup products. If your eye infection was caused by bacteria or a virus, throw away your old makeup and buy new products. Do not share contact lens equipment, containers, or solutions. Do not wear contact lenses until the infection is cured. Thoroughly clean your contacts before wearing them again. Do not share eye medicine. Do not share towels, linens, pillows, or handkerchiefs. Use clean linens, towels, and washcloths daily. Wash your hands and wear gloves if you are looking into someone else’s eye for a foreign object or helping someone else apply an eye medicine. When in the wind, heat, or cold, wear eye protection to prevent eye irritation. Wear safety glasses when working with chemicals. If you believe that you are coming down with pinkeye, please call your doctor and get seen. You do not want this to go on without treatment.

Wash Your Hands… It’s the Thing to Do!

Hand washing is easy to do and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness in all settings which includes from your home and workplace to child care facilities and hospitals. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. Many people ask when they should wash their hands. The answer is quiet simple and includes but is not limited to these. Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food, Before and after caring for someone who is sick, Before and after treating a cut or wound, After using the toilet, After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste and After touching garbage. Well as simple as that sounds, many say they do not know the right way to wash their hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tell us to wet our hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water and last, Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. Often we are out and about and need to wash our hands and may not have soap and clean, running water. Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy. You may ask “how do you use hand sanitizers?” Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount). Rub your hands together. Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. With December being Hand Washing Awareness Month, please take these tips provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and use them all year long!

Kerry Helms, 2017 Tree Lighter, Phoebe Worth Medical Center

Tree Lighting Ceremony – Phoebe Worth Medical Center – Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2016 at 7 p.m.

Kerry Helms has always worked with his hands. In 1977, he and his father started Helms Welding & Machine in Sylvester. “I love building stuff, taking a drawing or picture and building something out of it,” Kerry said. Unfortunately, the difficult treatment from a terrifying cancer diagnosis forced him to retire. “On October 14, 2013 I was diagnosed with stage 4 rectal and metastatic liver cancer. My whole world was turned upside down,” Kerry said. “I asked Dr. Mendenhall if I could beat it, what are my chances? He said 5 percent.” Thanks to the team at the Phoebe Cancer Center, Kerry is beating those odds. “I love every one of them. They’ve been nothing but great to me. The most compassionate people I’ve met in my life,” he said. Because his diagnosis was so serious, Kerry’s doctors gave him the opportunity to consult with physicians at some of the top cancer centers in the country. Instead, he chose to start his treatment immediately in Albany. “Phoebe has got the best cancer center anywhere around, as far as I’m concerned,” he said. “It’s been a godsend just being local and not having to travel to Atlanta.” Kerry’s journey has been tough. After getting great results from his cancer treatment, he developed a rare kind of pneumonia. “I was in ICU, and I quit breathing. Luckily, the doctors were right there and they got me back breathing,” Kerry said. He spent more than two months in the hospital and another 30 days in rehab learning to walk again. Then, his cancer returned. “At times it’s hard to stay optimistic, but I know the Lord has got a reason for me to be here. I think it’s to educate people on the importance of screenings.” Kerry nearly waited too long to get screened, and that’s a mistake he doesn’t want others to make. “Being the typical man, I’m not one to go to the doctor unless I get sick, and I never got sick. Once I started having problems, I just ignored it. It just kept getting worse,” he said. Kerry is back on a chemotherapy regimen and battling his cancer with strength and determination. He still works with his hands, too. In retirement, he taught himself the art of leatherwork. He spends his free time now making belts, holsters, keychains and journal covers. “I draw everything out and cut it out by hand and sew it by hand. It is labor intensive. It takes about 8 hours to sew one. Not many people do it all by hand like that,” he said. Kerry is proud of his leatherwork, but he’s more proud of his work to spread a lifesaving message. “If I can tell you my story and express the importance of getting checked and it saves your life, then I’ve done my job.” Please make plans to join The Martin News at this year’s event on Tuesday.
Source: Phoebe Worth Medical Center

Get Your Healthcare Questions Answered

Got questions about ACA and Medicaid? Ted Hall is a Federally Certified ACA (Affordable Care Act) Navigator who will answer your healthcare questions, look at options for you and your family and provide a chance to enroll in the program that is best suited for your situation. If you or someone you know could use assistance with healthcare information, send them to the Davis Room of the Margaret Jones Public Library on December 2nd from 9am-1pm. The library is located at 205 East Pope Street. No question is too big or too small so feel free to come and get the help you need.

Looking Beautiful and Young, Stacy Tells Us How To Do It

I love to wear makeup and I love all the colors. I am definitely no expert but I believe I have found a sweet friend and old classmate of mine, Stacy Nether, which is pretty close to being an expert with makeup. It does not even matter the color she wears. I have seen her in so many different colors and they all look flawless. I was able to get a few minutes of her time recently to get the inside scoop of her looking so fabulous and young! Most women, not all but most wear makeup. It’s something that little girls want to do. Why? Because they watch their mothers do it and they want to do it too. That is exactly what happened with Stacy. Her mother always kept magazines with glossy pictures of beautiful women from Essence, Ebony, Jet, Glamour and Vogue.  “My mother wore makeup” exclaimed Stacy “although not nearly as much as I do.” Stacy began playing in makeup at the age of nine.  She told me that she illegally wore makeup in her parents’ home by 16. We both laughed but I know exactly where she is coming from. When we were growing up, our parents did not allow us to wear much makeup if any so we all had to wear it illegally. She continues as an adult to wear makeup.  She became more interested in makeup as more than just a hobby about a year and a half ago when she saw how much of an influence it had become by the advance of social media.  “I’ve loved recreating looks that I see in magazines and television” stated Stacy. Of course while talking with Stacy, I had many questions. When you see someone look so young and spunky, you tend to want to follow that trend. So I asked Stacy what brands of makeup do you use, how long does it take you to get all your make up on and how long does your makeup stay on and do you reapply often? Now of course we had some laughs. She reminded me she was a single mom and on a teachers’ salary so shopping didn’t happen often. Oh how well we all know that feeling. When splurging on herself though she does like to visit Ulta and Sephora. Some of her favorites are Mac and L.A. Girls proconcealer and Black Radience BB Crème and Maybelline’s Fit Me foundation. For her brows she says Benefit’s Browzings are a must.  She loves Bobbi Bown, Urban Decay and Tooface as well. And for eye shadows, which everyone loves to see including myself, are from everywhere under the sun she explained. “As long as the color is highly pigmented and shows up nicely on my skin, which is sometimes hard because I have gold or orange undertones and sometimes the color may disappear” explained Stacy “this is why I wear eye shadow primer because it makes the colors pop and the shadow stays much longer.” I saw pictures of all of her makeup and colors and she has bunches to choose from. She enjoys using Beauty Supply Brands such as Ruby Kisses and Nicka K.  These are brands that hold up to the larger name brands!  Of course to get the look that Stacy wears does take some time. She explained to me that in order for her to create her full face look, it takes her anywhere from an hour to an hour and a half.  The regular daily face takes 30-45 minutes. Her makeup lasts all day. Don’t we all wish we had that kind of luck? “With the use of some really great inexpensive primers and setting sprays” stated Stacy “The only thing I may have to reapply would be lipstick or lip-gloss.” Now one aspect of makeup that I have questions about is whether you should wear different colors during the day vs. night, or summer vs. winter? Stacy explained that for her it mostly depends on how she’s dressed. If it’s a tee and jeans look then its brows always and mascara and lippie but if she wants a more dramatic look, then here comes everything she says. Right now she’s working more with fall and winter colors.  But Stacy exclaims life is too short so she says try it all and then add some glitter! I love glitter so adding glitter sounds great. I wanted to know what the trick was to looking so young since we are the same age. “Young looking, thanks so much” expressed Stacy “If only I could only tell you a secret. I have been through more than you can imagine!  I would have to say it’s God who has kept me all these years!  I eat like a twelve year old…I do try to eat better especially when I know I’ve “been bad.”  I had cystic acne when I was younger.  I used to be so self-conscious about my skin.  I saw a dermatologist as a late teen early adult and now my skin care regime is so simple now after trying everything under the sun: Aveeno, pure sumn, weekly St. Ives apricot scrub which I have used for years and coconut oil and or Shea butter which is all natural. Stacy has a ton of makeup of all kinds. She likes checking out the dollar stores as well and with it being the Christmas season, she says there is makeup and brushes EVERYWHERE!!! It makes her extremely happy!” If you have a special occasion coming up, Stacy is the lady to call. She does make up for weddings, proms, homecoming, and for a night on the town or just any occasion.  Stacy thinks you can doll up at anytime!  “There’s no better reason to do your makeup other than to create a better version of you” exclaimed Stacy!

Ten Tips for Building a Healthy Meal

1. Make half your plate veggies and fruits. Vegetables and fruits are full of nutrients and may help to promote good health. Choose red, orange and dark green vegetables such as tomatoes, sweet potatoes and broccoli.
 
2. Add lean protein. Choose protein foods such as lean beef and pork, or chicken, turkey, beans or tofu. Twice a week, make seafood the protein on your plate.
 
3. Include whole grains. Aim to make at least half your grains whole grains. Look for the words “100% whole grain” or “100% whole wheat” on the food label. Whole grains provide more nutrients, like fiber, than refined grains.
 
4. Don’t forget the dairy. Pair your meal with a cup of fat-free or low-fat mile. They provide the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but less fat and calories. Don’t drink milk? Try soymilk (soy beverage) as your beverage or include fat-free or low-fat yogurt in your meal.
 
5. Avoid extra fat. Using heavy gravies or sauces will add fat and calories to otherwise healthy choices. For example, steamed broccoli is great, but avoid topping it will cheese sauce. Try other options, like a sprinkling of low fat parmesan cheese or a squeeze of lemon.
 
6. Take your time. Savor your food. Eat slowly, enjoy the taste and textures, and pay attention to how you feel. Be mindful. Easting very quickly may cause you to eat too much.
 
7. Use a smaller plate. Using a smaller plate at meals will help with portion control. That way you can finish your entire plate and feel satisfied without overeating.
 
8. Take control of your food. Eat at home more often so you know exactly what you are eating. If you eat out, check and compare the nutrition information. Choose healthier options such as baked instead of fried.
 
9. Try new foods. Keep it interesting by picking put new foods you’ve never tried before, like mango, lentils or kale. You may find a new favorite. Trade fun and tasty recipes with friends or find them online.
 
10. Satisfy your sweet tooth in a healthy way. Indulge in a naturally sweet dessert dish…Fruit! Serve a fresh fruit cocktail or a fruit parfait made with yogurt. For a hot dessert, bake apples and top with cinnamon.
 
These are great ideas and can be beneficial to us all. This information was brought to you by www.choosemyplate.gov.

Bone Healthy

This may look like a skeleton but it will be one that will definitely get the children’s attention. It is made of all the great veggies that our children need for healthy eating. It is simple enough for them to design themselves too. A little bit of cherry tomatoes, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, bell peppers, cucumbers and even black olives to make a great snack. Try yours today!

Knowing the Signs of Pneumonia

Pneumonia Awareness Month is in November. Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus (purulent material), causing cough with phlegm or pus, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing. A variety of organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia. Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to life-threatening. It is most serious for infants and young children, people older than age 65, and people with health problems or weakened immune systems. The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe, depending on factors such as the type of germ causing the infection, and your age and overall health. Mild signs and symptoms often are similar to those of a cold or flu, but they last longer. Signs and symptoms of pneumonia may include:

Fever, sweating and shaking chills
Cough, which may produce phlegm
Chest pain when you breathe or cough
Shortness of breath
Fatigue
Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea

Newborns and infants may not show any sign of the infection. Or they may vomit, have a fever and cough, appear restless or tired and without energy, or have difficulty breathing and eating. People older than age 65 and people in poor health or with a weakened immune system may have a lower than normal body temperature. Older people who have pneumonia sometimes have sudden changes in mental awareness. Many germs can cause pneumonia. The most common are bacteria and viruses in the air we breathe. Your body usually prevents these germs from infecting your lungs. But sometimes these germs can overpower your immune system, even if your health is generally good. Pneumonia is classified according to the types of germs that cause it and where you got the infection. If you have any of these symptoms, be sure to contact your physician.

Hope is Believing There is Light Beyond the Darkness

The Phoebe Worth Tree Lighting Ceremony, Lights of Love, is scheduled for Thursday, November 28th at 7pm on the grounds of Phoebe Worth which is located at 807 South Isabella Street in Sylvester. This years Honorary Tree Lighter is Kerry Helms. Kerry has always worked with his hands. In 1977, he and his father started Helms Welding and Machine in Sylvester. “I love building stuff, taking a drawing or picture and building something out of it,” Kerry said. Unfortunately, the difficult treatment from a terrifying cancer diagnosis forced him to retire. “On October 14, 2013 I was diagnosed with stage 4 rectal and metastatic liver cancer. My whole world was turned upside down,: Kerry said. “I asked Dr. Mendenhall if I could beat it, what are my chances? He said 5 percent.” Thanks to the team at the Phoebe Cancer Center, Kerr is beating those odds. “I love every one of them. They’ve been nothing but great to me. The most compassionate people I’ve met in my life,” he said. Because his diagnosis was so serious, Kerry’s doctors gave him the opportunity to consult with physicians at some of the top cancer centers in the country. Instead, he chose to start his treatment immediately in Albany. “Phoebe has got the best cancer center anywhere around, as far as I’m concerned,” he said. “It’s been a godsend just being local and not having to travel to Atlanta.” There’s more to Kerry’s story and we would love for you to join us all on November 28th to meet Kerry and hear more of his story. A symbolic light of love can be purchased for a suggested $25 each. The money raised from the treat lighting event stays right here in Sylvester to help our own cancer patients.
Source: Phoebe Worth