Wash Your Hands… It’s the Right Thing to Do and Keeps You Well Too!

It’s National Hand Washing Week and we want to help keep everyone well. I know we at The Martin News has ran this information several times but if just one new person reads it this week, that may be a few more people that keeps the sicknesses down this winter. Hand washing is easy to do and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness in all settings which includes from your home and workplace to child care facilities and hospitals. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. Many people ask when they should wash their hands. The answer is quiet simple and includes but is not limited to these. Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food, Before and after caring for someone who is sick, Before and after treating a cut or wound, After using the toilet, After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste and After touching garbage. Well as simple as that sounds, many say they do not know the right way to wash their hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tell us to Wet our hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water and last, Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. Often we are out and about and need to wash our hands and may not have soap and clean, running water. Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy. You may ask “how do you use hand sanitizers?” Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount). Rub your hands together. Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. With December being Hand Washing Awareness Week, please take these tips provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and use them all year long!

Say No To Pinkeye

Recently I have had a severe case of pinkeye. I do not ever remember having it like this, if I have ever had this at all. I am still having issues and want to help anyone and everyone to prevent this. Pinkeye is spread through contact with the eye drainage, which contains the virus or bacteria that caused the pinkeye. Touching an infected eye leaves drainage on your hand. If you touch your other eye or an object when you have drainage on your hand, the virus or bacteria can be spread. The following tips help prevent the spread of pinkeye. Wash your hands before and after: Touching the eyes or face and using medicine in the eyes. Do not share eye makeup. Do not use eye makeup until the infection is fully cured, because you could re-infect yourself with the eye makeup products. If your eye infection was caused by bacteria or a virus, throw away your old makeup and buy new products. Do not share contact lens equipment, containers, or solutions. Do not wear contact lenses until the infection is cured. Thoroughly clean your contacts before wearing them again. Do not share eye medicine. Do not share towels, linens, pillows, or handkerchiefs. Use clean linens, towels, and washcloths daily. Wash your hands and wear gloves if you are looking into someone else’s eye for a foreign object or helping someone else apply an eye medicine. When in the wind, heat, or cold, wear eye protection to prevent eye irritation. Wear safety glasses when working with chemicals. If you believe that you are coming down with pinkeye, please call your doctor and get seen. You do not want this to go on without treatment.

Wash Your Hands… It’s the Thing to Do!

Hand washing is easy to do and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness in all settings which includes from your home and workplace to child care facilities and hospitals. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. Many people ask when they should wash their hands. The answer is quiet simple and includes but is not limited to these. Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food, Before and after caring for someone who is sick, Before and after treating a cut or wound, After using the toilet, After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste and After touching garbage. Well as simple as that sounds, many say they do not know the right way to wash their hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tell us to wet our hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water and last, Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. Often we are out and about and need to wash our hands and may not have soap and clean, running water. Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy. You may ask “how do you use hand sanitizers?” Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount). Rub your hands together. Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. With December being Hand Washing Awareness Month, please take these tips provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and use them all year long!

Driver Safety is for All Ages

It is a fact of life that people grow older everyday. With increasing age come changes in physical, mental and sensory abilities that can challenge a person’s continued ability to drive safely. But there are a variety of safe travel options for people of all ages. The real need is a broader awareness of the solutions, rather than a narrow focus on the problem. The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) believes that occupational therapy practitioners have the skills to evaluate a person’s overall ability to operate a vehicle safely and provide rehabilitation, if necessary. Many are specially trained in the full scope of driving rehabilitation. Occupational therapy practitioners work with older adults as well as their families and caregivers, offering individualized assessment. They can identify individuals’ unique challenges and find strategies that will help them live life to its fullest by keeping them active, healthy, and safe in their communities. AOTA’s Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, December 4–8, 2017, aims to promote understanding of the importance of mobility and transportation to ensuring older adults remain active in the community with such things as shopping, working or even volunteering, with the confidence that transportation will not be the barrier to strand them at home. The Martin News wishes everyone a great and wonderful holiday season. Stay safe and watch all the drivers around you. Merry Christmas and safe travels from The Martin News.

Looking Beautiful and Young, Stacy Tells Us How To Do It

I love to wear makeup and I love all the colors. I am definitely no expert but I believe I have found a sweet friend and old classmate of mine, Stacy Nether, which is pretty close to being an expert with makeup. It does not even matter the color she wears. I have seen her in so many different colors and they all look flawless. I was able to get a few minutes of her time recently to get the inside scoop of her looking so fabulous and young! Most women, not all but most wear makeup. It’s something that little girls want to do. Why? Because they watch their mothers do it and they want to do it too. That is exactly what happened with Stacy. Her mother always kept magazines with glossy pictures of beautiful women from Essence, Ebony, Jet, Glamour and Vogue.  “My mother wore makeup” exclaimed Stacy “although not nearly as much as I do.” Stacy began playing in makeup at the age of nine.  She told me that she illegally wore makeup in her parents’ home by 16. We both laughed but I know exactly where she is coming from. When we were growing up, our parents did not allow us to wear much makeup if any so we all had to wear it illegally. She continues as an adult to wear makeup.  She became more interested in makeup as more than just a hobby about a year and a half ago when she saw how much of an influence it had become by the advance of social media.  “I’ve loved recreating looks that I see in magazines and television” stated Stacy. Of course while talking with Stacy, I had many questions. When you see someone look so young and spunky, you tend to want to follow that trend. So I asked Stacy what brands of makeup do you use, how long does it take you to get all your make up on and how long does your makeup stay on and do you reapply often? Now of course we had some laughs. She reminded me she was a single mom and on a teachers’ salary so shopping didn’t happen often. Oh how well we all know that feeling. When splurging on herself though she does like to visit Ulta and Sephora. Some of her favorites are Mac and L.A. Girls proconcealer and Black Radience BB Crème and Maybelline’s Fit Me foundation. For her brows she says Benefit’s Browzings are a must.  She loves Bobbi Bown, Urban Decay and Tooface as well. And for eye shadows, which everyone loves to see including myself, are from everywhere under the sun she explained. “As long as the color is highly pigmented and shows up nicely on my skin, which is sometimes hard because I have gold or orange undertones and sometimes the color may disappear” explained Stacy “this is why I wear eye shadow primer because it makes the colors pop and the shadow stays much longer.” I saw pictures of all of her makeup and colors and she has bunches to choose from. She enjoys using Beauty Supply Brands such as Ruby Kisses and Nicka K.  These are brands that hold up to the larger name brands!  Of course to get the look that Stacy wears does take some time. She explained to me that in order for her to create her full face look, it takes her anywhere from an hour to an hour and a half.  The regular daily face takes 30-45 minutes. Her makeup lasts all day. Don’t we all wish we had that kind of luck? “With the use of some really great inexpensive primers and setting sprays” stated Stacy “The only thing I may have to reapply would be lipstick or lip-gloss.” Now one aspect of makeup that I have questions about is whether you should wear different colors during the day vs. night, or summer vs. winter? Stacy explained that for her it mostly depends on how she’s dressed. If it’s a tee and jeans look then its brows always and mascara and lippie but if she wants a more dramatic look, then here comes everything she says. Right now she’s working more with fall and winter colors.  But Stacy exclaims life is too short so she says try it all and then add some glitter! I love glitter so adding glitter sounds great. I wanted to know what the trick was to looking so young since we are the same age. “Young looking, thanks so much” expressed Stacy “If only I could only tell you a secret. I have been through more than you can imagine!  I would have to say it’s God who has kept me all these years!  I eat like a twelve year old…I do try to eat better especially when I know I’ve “been bad.”  I had cystic acne when I was younger.  I used to be so self-conscious about my skin.  I saw a dermatologist as a late teen early adult and now my skin care regime is so simple now after trying everything under the sun: Aveeno, pure sumn, weekly St. Ives apricot scrub which I have used for years and coconut oil and or Shea butter which is all natural. Stacy has a ton of makeup of all kinds. She likes checking out the dollar stores as well and with it being the Christmas season, she says there is makeup and brushes EVERYWHERE!!! It makes her extremely happy!” If you have a special occasion coming up, Stacy is the lady to call. She does make up for weddings, proms, homecoming, and for a night on the town or just any occasion.  Stacy thinks you can doll up at anytime!  “There’s no better reason to do your makeup other than to create a better version of you” exclaimed Stacy!

What’s Your Entrepreneur Story?

When you think about it, the world is crammed with great products that we take for granted, but that were once non-existent until they were somehow dreamed up by a budding entrepreneur. From the postage stamp to the jet engine, and the cheeseburger to the microchip, radical inventions by brilliant minds have changed the way we live our lives and shaped our futures. In recognition of these people you can now celebrate Entrepreneurship Day which, since its inauguration in 2010, is an annual event that honors those men and women who have very often created an empire from absolutely nothing, most of them making themselves rather wealthy in the process as well. America is a country made of entrepreneurs. Men and women who built something from nothing. Created jobs. Made America what it is today. In many ways, the present was built by them. e can genuinely hope that the next generation of potential Walt Disney, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Coco Chanel might be inspired to launch their business model and take the world by storm by the stories of some of the greatest businessmen and women of our time. Entrepreneurs’ Day was started in 2010 by David Hauser and Siamak Taghaddos, co-founders of Grasshopper, the entrepreneur’s phone system, as well as Amir Tehrani, entrepreneur and co-founder of The Legacy Foundation. The holiday falls on the last day of Global Entrepreneurship week, during Entrepreneurship Month and is meant to be a way of showing gratitude and respect to the people who achieved success, sometimes against all odds, and were able to help a lot of people by creating jobs for them in the process. In 2012, President Barack Obama declared November as Entrepreneurship Month. My Entrepreneur story is great to me and possible for anyone. I had a vision of a positive news source and started it in May of 2014 and I am going stronger and better than ever. I have no one to brag on but my mighty God that has made everything possible for me. Yes, I work extremely hard and yes, there are days that I work into wee hours of the morning but to step back and look at the final product makes me know that I am doing just what God had planned. My mother is a huge part of this business along with her friend that keeps us straight. I am thankful for the ones in Sylvester that supports me, I am very thankful for my supportive customers and friends in all the other counties that support us as well. We would not be what we are today without you so thank you for everything and may God bless you all.

Our Kids Our Future

Rodriquez Thomas, a native of Albany, Georgia and the Founder/President and CEO of Our Kids Our Future, LLC spoke to the 8th grade students on Friday at WCMS. He is a motivational speaker who encourages students to make good choices. He is a graduate of Dougherty High School and a College graduate of Albany Technical College where he was an honor student and that’s where his passion for helping kids grew outside of caring for his own. While attending college, Mr. Thomas was named Mr. Everything in 2010/2011, he was an honor graduate, Vice President of Student Government, Ambassador of Education, Skills USA, Foundation Setters for Future Minds, President of Student Activities, and Ran for Student of the Year. And if that isn’t enough, he was named 2011 Mr. ATC Homecoming King as well as was responsible for naming the streets around the college. His name will always be imbedded on the campus. He is a devoted father, son, uncle and God father. He is also a philanthropist, educator, and mentor and soon to be an author of a children’s activity book. The students and staff enjoyed him on Friday. Please see his visit on the Worth County Middle School Facebook Page.
Source: WCSD Facebook Page

Tips for Safely Frying a Turkey

Frying a holiday turkey can be tricky. Here are some tips from UGA experts to help make sure your bird is thoroughly cooked and your holiday doesn’t include a trip to the emergency room or a call to the fire department. “People who fry turkeys say it produces a moister turkey. And it’s quicker,” said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Cooperative Extension food safety specialist. “But in the eyes of safety experts, the typical propane-fueled turkey fryer is a major accident waiting to happen. There are definitely safety issues to consider.” Don’t use too much oil: Some of the most serious injuries are caused by faulty or misused equipment, like unstable fryer stands, uninsulated pot handles and or fry pots that have been overfilled with oil. Filling the pot too full of oil can cause the oil to spill over when the turkey is placed in the pot. Spillovers at cooking temperatures can cause severe burns, Andress warns. Food safety by the fryer: “You have to be sure all the harmful bacteria have been killed,” Andress said. “The only way to do this is to measure the temperature of the cooked turkey in several places with a food thermometer.” First, heat the oil to 365 to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. This usually takes 45 minutes to an hour. Next, add your turkey and allow the oil to return to 365 to 375 degrees. Whole turkeys require about 3 minutes per pound to cook. To be sure your bird is safely cooked, she said, the temperature must reach at least 165 degrees in the thickest part of the breast. Some cooks prefer the innermost part of the thigh to reach 180 degrees. Andress recommends following these safety steps: Use propane-fired turkey fryers outdoors, a safe distance from buildings and anything that can burn, never use turkey fryers on wooden decks or inside garages, place the fryer on a flat surface to reduce the risk of accidental tipping, never leave the fryer unattended, never allow children or pets near the fryer. Even after use, the oil inside the pot can remain dangerously hot for hours, don’t overfill the fryer, use well-insulated potholders or oven mitts when touching the pot or lid handles, make sure the turkey is completely thawed. Be careful with marinades. Oil and water don’t mix, and water causes oil to spill over, which could cause a fire or explosion hazard and keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby. And never use water to extinguish a grease fire.
Source: Tifton Grapevine

The Commissioner of Securities Announces Amendment to the Invest Georgia Exemption (IGE)

The Securities and Charities Division of The Office of the Secretary of State (“Division”) has adopted an amendment to Rule 590-4-2-.08, the Invest Georgia Exemption, to reflect changes implemented by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The SEC changes are designed to modernize the intrastate offering exemption of Section 3(a)(11) of the Securities Act of 1933 by updating the Rule 147 safe harbor and introducing a new exemption, Rule 147A. The purpose of the Division’s amendment is to facilitate greater investment through the offer or sale of a security by an issuer by providing greater flexibility to those seeking to use IGE to facilitate investment and entrepreneurial activities within Georgia. Additionally, the amendment to IGE is intended to reduce the regulatory impact of the SEC’s amendment on existing and future issuers of securities.  This amendment is effective as of  July 11, 2017. The Invest Georgia Exemption (“IGE”) was created in 2011 by the Secretary of State Brian P. Kemp in his capacity as Commissioner of Securities. IGE allows for-profit businesses formed under Georgia law to raise up to $5 million from Georgia resident investors. Under IGE, Issuers of securities are limited to selling no more than $10,000 in securities to non-accredited Georgia investors. There is no limit for accredited Georgia investors. The Issuer must file a Form GA-1 with the Georgia Commissioner of Securities. For more information on the IGE, please contact the Georgia Securities Division at 404-654-6023 or registrations@sos.ga.gov. IGE is a notice filing and does not constitute a license or registration. The issuance of a notice filing does not mean that the Georgia Commissioner of Securities has passed, in any way, upon the truth, completeness, or accuracy of the information filed, the merits of the securities offered, or has recommended or given approval to such security or transaction.

Golden Radish Award: Tift Schools Named Outstanding for Farm to School

The Tift County School System has been given the “Outstanding District” Golden Radish Award, the highest level of recognition in the state for farm-to-school programs. Tift County’s School Nutrition Department’s mission is to expose, educate and elevate the quality of meals served to 7,600 students in the district’s 12 schools.  Its initiative is recognized as one of the state’s most innovative programs focused on agricultural and nutrition education, supporting local farmers and getting students excited to eat healthy and fresh local foods.  Tift County Schools was also recognized at the Platinum level for its accomplishments during the last school year, which include: (1) The School Nutrition Department purchased a cow from a student and had it processed by a local community partner. The meat provided meals for four days to more than 300 students at Omega Elementary, (2) The district supports a 15-acre farm where students learn how to plant, maintain and glean crops on a larger scale. Students also learn how to extend the life of their harvest at the county’s state of the art canning facility maintained by an FFA instructor ns (3) Local farmer Len Lastinger taught students how to harvest eggs from the schools’ laying hens. The corresponding omelet taste test was a big hit. Georgia’s agriculture, education and public health departments, along with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and Georgia Organics representatives joined at the Georgia Railroad Freight Depot in Atlanta to celebrate more than 40 percent of Georgia school districts with farm to school programs. Pictured is Ga. Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black, from left, Georgia Organics Director Alice Rolls, Tift Superintendent Patrick Atwater, Tift School Nutrition Director Vanessa Hayes, Ga. Health Commissioner J. Patrick O’Neal, UGA Extension Dean Laura Perry Johnson and state School Superintendent Richard Woods at the Atlanta ceremony.
Source: Tifton Grapevine