~ Dates to Remember ~

December

18th ~ City of Sylvester Council Meeting
18th ~ Band Concert at WCMS
19th ~ PJ Day at WCPS
19th ~ Last Day of School for Worth County Schools for Christmas Break
19th ~ City of Warwick Council Meeting
19th ~ Good Behavior Break at WCMS
19th ~ Books & Bubbles at The Margaret Jones Public Library
20th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
20th ~ Intervention Day at WCMS
20th ~ Worth County Schools Out
21st ~ Worth County Schools Out
22nd ~ Worth County Schools Out
25th ~ Merry Christmas from The Martin News
26th ~ Sylvester – Worth County Family Connections Meeting
26th ~ Disaster Relief Support Group at The Margaret Jones public Library
26th ~ Worth County Schools Out
27th ~ Worth County Schools Out
27th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
28th ~ Worth County Schools Out
29th ~ Worth County Schools Out

January

1st ~ Happy New Year from The Martin News
3rd ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
4th ~ WCMS Basketball Games
9th ~ Leadership Worth Class
10th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
15th ~ City f Sylvester Council Meeting
16th ~ City of Warwick Council Meeting
17th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
23rd ~ Sylvester – Worth County Family Connections Meeting
24th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
31st ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester

Do you have an event that needs announced?
Please email your questions or event listings to info@themartinnews.com
and we will get them listed on the calendar.
Thank you for your support to The Martin News.

Helping Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation by Donating Glasses

The Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation receives donations of used prescription eyeglasses, over the counter readers and sunglasses. Lighthouse volunteers wash, read, label and pack the donated glasses to get them ready to go overseas. Church groups, medical missions and other volunteer groups contact the Lighthouse throughout the year to get glasses for their relief and mission trips. The Lighthouse provides over 100,000 pairs of glasses for oversees use every year. The following are stories of the people the Lighthouse Foundation helps through eyeglass recycling. The people of Prislop, Romania have limited access to healthcare and no vision care. In rural Romania, they are far from most amenities that we take for granted here in the US. The best they can do is to rely on the goodwill of others – people to donate glasses here in the US and mission/relief trips to deliver the glasses. Most of the people trying on glasses would hold a book and try to read it. If the glasses didn’t help, they would put on another pair. This process was repeated over and over again by each person until everyone found a pair that helped them to see clearly. But one woman wasn’t holding a book; she was holding a syringe and pointing it at her arm. She was a diabetic and was testing to see which glasses would help her see the correct medication amount and the veins to inject herself. Without these glasses she may have had other medical difficulties because she was unable to see her syringe. Lion Cecil Davis took a trip to Jinja, Uganda with a small group of people from the Faithful Servants Missionary Team in Carrolton, GA. He had never been on a mission trip before and learned a lot about the continent of Africa and the country of Uganda. Before the trip he had taken a class on how to use a FOCOMETER®, a device that measures nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. The group had an interpreter to help when screening the patients and they were able to help 425 people in a ten day period! Since his trip, Cecil has received additional training on how to use the device and is planning to take another trip to South Africa. Recently a church group, led by a member of a local Lions Club from North Georgia, took 500 pairs of donated glasses to Honduras. Many of the women there sew for a living and without glasses they are unable to work. The women were thrilled, after trying on glasses, to be able to see to thread a needle. That meant they could work again! They would be able to earn a living and help to provide for themselves and their families. Collecting glasses is an easy thing we can do to help. Please help by donating glasses to The Martin News as my son collects glasses to give the Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation to help others. You can email me and I will be glad to get the glasses. My email is lmanley1210@gmail.com. Thank you to everyone for your help!

Winners of Georgia Peanut Calendar Photo Contest Announced

The Georgia Peanut Commission hosted a photo contest June 7-Oct. 1, 2017, to fill the pages of the 2018 Georgia Peanut Calendar, “Photos from the Field.” Peanut farmers from across Georgia were encouraged to submit their best high-resolution photo of peanut production on their farm for a chance to feature the photo in the 2018 calendar. Nearly 100 entries were submitted from across the peanut belt and only 12 were selected as a monthly feature. Photos were selected based on quality, originality and diversity in the field. Since many outstanding photos were submitted, but only 12 could be used as monthly features, honorable mentions were also selected. Winners and honorable mentions are as follows:

Winners:
January: Ashley Moore, Crisp County
February: Luke Brown, Wilcox County
March: Aaron Moore, Crisp County
April: Casey Cox, Mitchell County
May: Chandler Starling, Emanuel County
June: Judson Clark, Lee County
July: Lauren Turner, Decatur County
August: Jay Blanton, Brooks County
September: Jonathan Smith, Coffee County
October: Linda Powell, Worth County
November: Haley McGuffin, Twiggs County
December: Roger Wayne Davis, Miller County

Honorable Mentions:
Brandy Hussey, Sumter County
Greg Brown, Crisp County
Haley McGuffin, Twiggs County
Casey Cox, Mitchell County
Judson Clark, Sumter County
Jay Blanton, Brooks County
David Cromley, Bulloch County
Linda Powell, Worth County
Sherrill Napier, Cook County

Photo submissions will also be used in promotional materials produced by GPC throughout the year. To obtain a copy of the 2018 Georgia Peanut Calendar, stop by the GPC office located at 445 Fulwood Blvd. Tifton, Georgia, 31794. For more information on GPC programs and to view the winning photos, visit www.gapeanuts.com.

2017 King Cotton Awards Presented to Sawyer and Miller: Taylor R. Sills, Georgia Cotton Commission

Georgia’s cotton farmers rely heavily on their local University of Georgia (UGA) Cooperative Extension agent for many things.  Agents are known for delivering timely and accurate information, which is instrumental for the success of Georgia’s farmers. For the seventeenth year in a row, the Georgia Cotton Commission sponsored the King Cotton Awards to recognize outstanding contributions of county agents to Georgia cotton producers. The Senior Award is for agents with 10 or more years of experience, while the Junior Award, named the Allen B. Fulford Award, is for those with less than 10 years of service. The latter award honors the accomplishments and memory of Allen B. Fulford as a county Extension agent and state cotton agronomist.  The awards were presented at the 2017 Georgia Association of County Agricultural Agents Annual Meeting & Professional Improvement Conference held in Columbus in November. The 2017 Senior King Cotton Award winner is Andrew Sawyer of Wilcox County, where he serves as Agriculture & Natural Resources Agent.  He previously served as the ANR agent in Thomas County.  Sawyer has conducted variety trials with producers, and has put an emphasis on educating growers about new technologies and techniques.   He has worked tirelessly to educate the community on cotton through various means, including a weekly radio show that reached over 250,000 people.  For this, he received the Communications award from the Georgia Association of County Agricultural Agents.  Sawyer also has a blog that gives farmers, agribusinesses, and the general public with timely tips and educational information concerning agriculture and the environment.  He received both a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and a Master of Plant Pathology and Pest Management from the University of Georgia, where he also was a member of the Redcoat Marching Band. The 2017 Allen B. Fulford Award recipient is Jennifer Miller of Jeff Davis County, where she serves as ANR Agent.  She began her career with Gold Kist, and came to UGA Extension in 2006 as the 4-H Agent in Wheeler County.  She later served as the ANR Agent in Montgomery County and covered Treutlen County for part of that time.  Miller participates in the Statewide On-Farm Variety trials, a statewide project managed by county agents and Dr. Jared Whitaker, UGA Cotton Agronomist.  She has also conducted trials that have focused on irrigation and nematodes.  Miller has a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree from UGA, where she majored in Agriscience & Environmental Systems. The Georgia Cotton Commission is a producer-funded organization located in Perry, Georgia. The Commission began in 1965. Georgia cotton producers pay an assessment enabling the Commission to invest in programs of research, promotion, and education on behalf of all cotton producers of Georgia. For more information about the Georgia Cotton Commission please call 478-988-4235 or on the web at www.georgiacottoncommission.org.

Voting is Open for Park Ranger of the Year: Former Worth County High School Graduate has been Nominated

Bryan Gray, a 1998 graduate of Worth County High School, has been nominated for Park Ranger of the Year. Bryan has been the manager at Stephen C. Foster located inside the Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge for over six years. When he arrived at the park to begin his duties, the refuge was in the midst of the Honey Prairie Fire. He learned valuable lessons from that fire that helped him to be able to provide valuable assistance in this year’s West Mims Fire that burned thousands of acres around the park. This fire was followed shortly after Hurricane Irma that greatly impacted operations at the park. Irma arrived just over one year after Hurricane Matthew impacted the park. Bryan led clean-up at several sites along the coast of Georgia following both storms. Bryan is widely recognized as a leader in Georgia State Parks & Historic Sites. There are currently four park managers and two assistant managers working on other parks that trained under him at Stephen C. Foster. Under Bryan’s direction, the park provides guided interpretive boat tours of the world famous Okefenokee Swamp. Due to its isolated location, Bryan was able to secure for the designation as a Gold Level Dark Sky Park from the International Dark Sky Association. The park now offers a wide range of astronomy and dark sky programs year round. Bryan operates two units of the park separated by 17 miles in one of the most remote locations in Georgia. Under his direction both units have seen record growth in visitation, revenue, and occupancy. ServiceWear Apparel was looking for park rangers who have gone above and beyond to serve their park and community, and who have demonstrated dedication to preservation of the park and its natural environment, leadership through obstacles to create the best possible park experience for visitors and staff and commitment to safety and protection of park and visitors by smart thinking and intentional action. Nominees must be actively serving as a park ranger of a park in the United States to be eligible to win. Using the criteria outlined above, ServiceWear Apparel selected a group of finalists. Public online voting on the finalists takes place from November 27, 2017 to December 20, 2017. Anyone is invited to vote, once per day, for any one of the finalists. You are able to do so by visiting http://www.servicewearapparel.com/ranger/voting.php. The winning park ranger will receive a $1,000 grand prize and $1,000 worth of work wear for his or her park. The nominator with the winning submission will receive a Red Kap® Soft Shell Jacket. In the event the ranger cannot accept prizes, the award can be donated to the park or the charity of the winning park ranger’s choice. So spread the word and invite your friends and co-workers to vote now and vote often for Worth County’s favorite park ranger! Your vote determines the winners, so standby for the winner announcement on January 2!

~ Dates to Remember ~

December

11th ~ Downtown Sylvester Christmas Parade
11th ~ WCMS Basketball Games
11th ~ Math Inventory – WCMS
11th ~ Hunter Safety Courses at The Margaret Jones Public Library
12th ~ Hunter Safety Courses at The Margaret Jones Public Library
12th ~ Books & Bubbles at The Margaret Jones Public Library
12th ~ Choral Concert at Unity – Worth Schools
12th ~ After School Program at WCMS
13th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
13th ~ Free Legal Help at The Margaret Jones Public Library
14th ~ WCMS Basketball Games
18th ~ City of Sylvester Council Meeting
18th ~ Band Concert at WCMS
19th ~ PJ Day at WCPS
19th ~ Last Day of School for Worth County Schools for Christmas Break
19th ~ City of Warwick Council Meeting
19th ~ Good Behavior Break at WCMS
19th ~ Books & Bubbles at The Margaret Jones Public Library
20th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
20th ~ Intervention Day at WCMS
20th ~ Worth County Schools Out
21st ~ Worth County Schools Out
22nd ~ Worth County Schools Out
25th ~ Merry Christmas from The Martin News
26th ~ Sylvester – Worth County Family Connections Meeting
26th ~ Disaster Relief Support Group at The Margaret Jones public Library
26th ~ Worth County Schools Out
27th ~ Worth County Schools Out
27th ~ Kiwanis Club Meeting in Sylvester
28th ~ Worth County Schools Out
29th ~ Worth County Schools Out

Do you have an event that needs announced?
Please email your questions or event listings to info@themartinnews.com
and we will get them listed on the calendar.
Thank you for your support to The Martin News.

Good Ole Gingerbread Houses

Gingerbread House Day is a day that can be celebrated in a wide variety of fun ways and will be a day that children in particular will really enjoy and always remember. Celebrating National Gingerbread House Day involves creating a gingerbread house. But, the best part is that once the house has been created it can be devoured! And it will be yummy! Gingerbread House Day should be a social event and be used as something that engages children and adults alike. Children and parents can make a gingerbread house together and then, later, the gingerbread houses can be eaten at a party especially laid on for the occasion. Alternatively, a giant gingerbread house can be created by several people, with guests invited to decorate it with icing, sugar or sweets. Did you know that charities also benefit via Gingerbread House Day. Portions of a gingerbread house, or mini gingerbread houses can be sold to raise funds for the charity which is used as a great fundraiser. Larry and I love to build gingerbread houses because you don’t have to be perfect in building it and you can be as creative as you want or not creative at all. We love to build the houses but then we love to eat some of it too! Have fun building your gingerbread house today and be sure to post them on Facebook for everyone to see.

Games of all Sorts

When you were growing up, what games did you like to play? I have always loved playing games. Not only board games, but I liked all sorts of games. December 20th is a day that is recognized for games known as Games Day. Games Day is a yearly run gaming convention sponsored by Games Workshop. It was started in 1975, after another game convention scheduled for August that year cancelled. Games Workshop decided to fill the resulting gap by running a gaming day of their own according to the game day website. As a result, after some delays, the first Games Day was held at Seymour Hall, London on December 20, 1975. The convention was important because there were few outlets for gamers to meet each other and play, and Games Workshop used this in their efforts to build the gaming scene in the U.K. Following this successful start, and encouraged by mainstream media coverage, the second Games Day was held at a different venue, Chelsea Town Hall, London, on February 12, 1977. The event was somewhat delayed, owing to the logistics of running a rapidly expanding business. It followed rapidly by a separate “D&D Day” at Fulham Town Hall on March 12, this being their core funding stream at that time. Today the Games Day convention is held regularly in the United Kingdom at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. It draws enthusiasts of Games Workshop’s three main games (Warhammer 40,000, Warhammer, and Lord of the Rings). Not just a commercial venture, gamers go to play their games and attend presentations by special guests from the Games Workshop’s head office in Nottingham. Alongside the gaming is a dealer’s area which commonly includes products from Citadel Miniatures, particularly, armies for all the game systems scheduled for release. Another attraction is the Golden Demon, a painting competition of miniatures. There is also a competition of varying degrees of seriousness, the Scrap Demon competition, in which competitors create models from plastic sprues. Game day is taken very serious by some people. I am just a simple game day person. I use to love to play monopoly but it is a long game. As a child, I played pick-up sticks, UNO, old maid and go fish. As I grew older, my daddy us how to play a family game called Progressive Rummy. This game was known throughout my family. All of my aunts, uncles, cousins, parents and grandparents could play this card game. If you were a friend of the family and you came around much, you learned the game too. It is so amazing for me now because I have taught my child how to play in hopes he will pass it down too. I am sure other families play Progressive Rummy however it is not heard of much. During this holiday season, take a night out and have game night with your family. Whether it is a board game or a card game, you all will have a blast. Happy gaming!

Wash Your Hands… It’s the Right Thing to Do and Keeps You Well Too!

It’s National Hand Washing Week and we want to help keep everyone well. I know we at The Martin News has ran this information several times but if just one new person reads it this week, that may be a few more people that keeps the sicknesses down this winter. Hand washing is easy to do and it’s one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness in all settings which includes from your home and workplace to child care facilities and hospitals. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. Many people ask when they should wash their hands. The answer is quiet simple and includes but is not limited to these. Before, during, and after preparing food, Before eating food, Before and after caring for someone who is sick, Before and after treating a cut or wound, After using the toilet, After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet, After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste and After touching garbage. Well as simple as that sounds, many say they do not know the right way to wash their hands. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tell us to Wet our hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water and last, Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. Often we are out and about and need to wash our hands and may not have soap and clean, running water. Washing hands with soap and water is the best way to reduce the number of microbes on them in most situations. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of microbes on hands in some situations, but sanitizers do not eliminate all types of germs. Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy. You may ask “how do you use hand sanitizers?” Apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount). Rub your hands together. Rub the product over all surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. With December being Hand Washing Awareness Week, please take these tips provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and use them all year long!